Intel Ivy Bridge Overclocking Guide

Configuring your CPU for Overclocking
There are a number of settings in your BIOS that need to be set correctly for overclocking.

Before we start, update your BIOS. Go to your motherboard manufacturer’s website, download and install the latest version. This is important, so do it.

Next, we need to set some of the more generic settings for good overclocking capability.

It is worth noting that I am taking the names of these settings from my ASRock board. The correct names could be different on your board.

Spread Spectrum: Always disable. This is of no use to us when overclocking.
Internal PLL Overvoltage: A matter of preference, Enabling it will give you more stability on your clock, but will likely cause issues if you wish to “Sleep” your computer. I always set this to “Enabled” when overclocking.
Intel SpeedStep Technology: This lets your voltage drop when you’re idling (if you’re using offset mode.. more later.) Enabled.
Intel Turbo Boost Technology: Enabled. This allows you to set the following parameters.. These settings are simply “limits” and when we’re overclocking we don’t like limits. So, we’ll set them to max.
Turbo Boost Power Limit: Manual
Long: 500
Long Duration: 1s
Short: 500
Additional Turbo Voltage: Auto

Next we need to configure our RAM. Go to your BIOS RAM section, and load the XMP profile that your RAM is rated at. The most common clock speed at the moment is 1600mhz, so I’ll use that as an example. Some boards will automatically load the correct settings, but some will not. Check the sticker on the side of your RAM and match the speed that you see, as well as the timings, to your speed/timings in BIOS. We’re not going to overclock your RAM right now, and that’s for another guide.

Now, to overclock!

Voltages
CPU Ratio Setting: Manual
CPU Ratio: Stock on a 3570k is 34x, on a 3770k it’s 35x. This is how we overclock the chip. We change the multiplier to gain speed. If you want an overclock of 4ghz, you pick 40x as the multiplier. 4.5ghz is 45x, and so on.

Next, you need to decide HOW you want to overclock your CPU. You have two options, fixed voltage mode, where your chip will run at the voltage you set as well as the speed 100% of the time. Or, there’s offset voltage mode, which will allow your CPU to automatically drop its speed and voltage when you’re idle. I like to go offset, but it’s a matter of preference.

CPU Core Voltage: Auto, Offset, Fixed. Don’t choose auto.. we’re overclocking, remember?

After this, another option becomes available to us. Offset Voltage or Voltage, depending on your choice to the previous option. Set the voltage your chip receives here. See below for how to deal with this setting.

Power Saving Mode: Always disable. We’re overclocking, we don’t want to save power. We want moooore power!

DO NOT CHANGE THE BCLK (aka FSB) SETTINGS. It allows you to but you NEVER SHOULD. This guide is written for the Sandy Bridge 1155 chipset, and changing the BCLK is STRONGLY NOT RECOMMENDED.

Memory Voltage: Match this to your RAMs rated voltage for now. Don’t exceed 1.65v.

PCH: Auto. LEAVE THIS SETTING ALONE.

CPU PLL: PLL can reduce temps if lower, but this can affect system stability. Many people think that the stock voltage is too high. I won’t comment on that, but if you’re not confident with this setting, leave it on Auto.

VTT Voltage: Can help stabilize and overclock, but don’t touch it unless you get a BSOD code that signifies you should. Intels max is 1.08v which you shouldn’t exceed if you can avoid it.

DO NOT EVER GO OVER THE MAXIMUM VOLTAGES AS LISTED ABOVE WHEN OVERCLOCKING.
DO NOT EVER GO OVER THE MAXIMUM VOLTAGES AS LISTED ABOVE WHEN OVERCLOCKING.

Don’t say I didn’t warn you.

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