Nvidia Enthusiast System Architecture

nVidia Control Panel
The nVidia Control Panel looks identical to the one we’ve seen for the past couple of generations of geForce drivers. The ESA tweaks are well hidden, so well that you probably wouldn’t notice it. Click on “device settings” under “Performance”, and you find the other major point of ESA.

The first item you see is the CPU. Tweaks are the FSB clock and CPU fan. Though they are there, CPU voltage didn’t show up on my rig. Of course, overclocking is best done in the BIOS, but if you need a quick boost for something, you can do it here.

You can also set up rules for each device, such as increasing fan speeds for increasing temperatures, etc.

nVidia Enthusiast System Architecture nVidia Enthusiast System Architecture

Next is the Motherboard section. Besides another place to tweak the FSB, you can also tweak the PCI-E frequency here, along with changing fan speeds. My board provided no access to increase the NB voltage here, which might be cool.

The Memory section allows for changing timings. My board didn’t allow for changing Vdimm or memory divider.

nVidia Enthusiast System Architecture nVidia Enthusiast System Architecture

Next the GPU section. You can overclock the GPU, memory, and Shaders here, along with changing the fan speed.

The only tweak on the Power Supply section is fan speed, but you can see all relevant voltages and amperages that were available in the Monitor.

nVidia Enthusiast System Architecture nVidia Enthusiast System Architecture

The Chassis section allows for changing front and rear fan speed. My window fan was not included in the ESA module of the case, so it isn’t available here. This may be the coolest of all the tweaks in the control panel.

Finally, the WaterCooler section. This is the only way to change fan and pump speed on the Thermaltake BigWater 850e, so this section is significant if you have one.

nVidia Enthusiast System Architecture nVidia Enthusiast System Architecture

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