Thermaltake Bigwater 760 Pro Water Cooling System Review

Conclusion
Let me start of this ending by saying that I am still excited about this product. Of course the overclock ceiling was a little low, but I have to say that this kit still has great potential. That potential is of course expandability. I believe the reason for our limited overclock should be pretty obvious. We are likely limited by the radiator. Both in size and location I believe this is the chink in the armor of an otherwise superb watercooling kit. Physically the radiator is particularly inferior to the much thicker one used in say the Water 3.0 Pro. A radiator of this thickness I would have liked to see be no smaller than 240mm. The fan and fin density does it’s best, but it just doesn’t cut it. Then there is the cramped location with just a single fan. Although it is clever and clean, having the radiator stuffed into the 5.25” bays means it’s rather unlikely it will ever get cool fresh air.

Having said all that with this kit you have enough tubing left over that you would only need to spend a small amount in addition to the already appropriate price to add an additional radiator and really up the performance. In addition to being able to add more radiators the kit’s 500 L/hr flow rate will support additional water blocks as well which really adds value. Hopefully we will be able to test out this ability in a future expanded review.

Everything about this kit was simple, it really was quite a joy to install. There is nothing to be intimidated by with watercooling anymore thanks to Tt. The fan stays nice and quiet thanks to the control knob. And actually ranging from 1893 rpm – 2636 rpm the noise level was acceptable all around.

Overall ThinkComputers would like to award the Thermaltake Bigwater 760 Pro Water Cooling System an 8 out of 10 score.

Pros:
– Cost
– Ease of use
– Fit and Finish
– Expandability

Cons:
– Better cooling can be had for a lower cost

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